Continuity of Learning - Special Education

Supporting Students with Special Education Needs

Thames Valley remains committed to ensuring that every student has the opportunity to learn.  During this unprecedented time that our schools are closed, there may be additional challenges for our students with special education needs. Parent(s)/guardian(s) of students with special education needs are encouraged to refer to the information that follows to help navigate Learning at Home. 

SEA Equipment 

During the week of March 30th, parent(s)/guardian(s) of students with Special Education Amount (SEA) assistive technology were invited to complete a survey on the Parent Portal if their child’s laptop, Chromebook, or IPad was not at home and they would like to retrieve it from the school.  The distribution of this equipment is scheduled to begin on April 6th.  Parent(s)/guardian(s) should expect to receive a phone call from the principal of their child’s school to arrange a ‘curb-side pick-up’.  If you did not have the opportunity to complete last week’s survey and would still like to pick up their SEA assistive technology, please do not hesitate to contact your child’s principal to arrange a mutualy convenient time.

Please note that, as part of Phase 1 of the deployment of SEA equipment, principals will only be distributing the device and the charging cable.  The distribution of peripheral devices, such as but not limited to, earphones, the mouse, printers, and other larger pieces of SEA equipment will be considered during subsequent phases of deployment.

Mental Health and Professional Supports for Students

Psychology and Social Work staff will continue to reach out to families and remain available to students to support them during this difficult time. 

We remind students and families to access Kids Help Phone, providing 24/7 counselling and information at 1-800-668-6868 or text CONNECT to 686868.

Be mindful of your child’s stress or worry.

Your continued attention to your children’s questions and concerns is important. Continue to monitor and limit exposure to media. You can be supportive by listening, validating their worries and concerns, and reassuring them that this situation is time-limited. Here are some resources you might find helpful: Talking about COVID-19 and Talking to your Anxious Child 

For more information and supports for your family, please visit the TVDSB Mental Health and Well-Being Site

Assistive Technology for Parents and Students

As your Assistive Technology TOSA team, we are happy to provide ways to help your child use the tools available to them through their @gotvdsb.ca accounts! These are powerful tools that can help your students read, write and communicate for all subjects in a variety of ways. Visit Asssitive Technology for Parents and Students for more information.

A Week at a Glance

During this current phase of Learn at Home, staff from the Special Education Department will continue to update the A Week at a Glance pages that follow. 

Please note – the expectations on the Individual Education Plans of students drive their learning. The following activities can help contribute to these goals during time at home. Please choose the activities that are of interest to your child to keep learning fun.

Routines are CRITICAL! Following a similar routine every day will help ease the transition back to school. We all do our best work when we know what is expected. Routine is a way to ensure that your child knows what to expect and what is expected.

June 22 - June 26
Printable PDF version
June 22 - June 26 
June 15 - June 19
Printable PDF Version
June 15 - June 19
Life Skills

*Please continue to provide opportunities to practice the life skills previously posted in the Week at Glance. 

Sun Safety

With summer upon us, it is important to play and be safe in the sun.  It is also important to establish good sun safety habits early on so that they stick and become routine.  Consider using visuals and/or modelling to help teach and support children in developing healthy sun habits.  Some tips and visuals are listed below that may be helpful.

1.Wear protective clothing (hat, sunglasses, shirt).

2.Limit time in the sun between 11 am to 3 pm when the sun’s rays are the strongest.

3.Use sunscreen - Use sunscreen on all exposed areas but pay close attention to the areas that are most exposed, face, lips, ears, neck, shoulders, back, knees, and the tops of feet.

4.Drink plenty of water and eat healthy food to stay hydrated.

5.Stay in the shade as much as possible.

Oral Language and Literacy
Monday

Literacy & Technology 

Heads Up App: Download the free app called “Heads Up” on your device. This is a family game where  you set a timer for two minutes and have one player hold their card (displayed on device) to their forehead without looking at it. The other players will yell out clues for the first player. The first player will continue to guess who is on their card until correct or until they decide to pass. Repeat until the two minutes is complete.

Reading With Your Ears: Sound Blending

This week we will practice an important skill for reading - sound blending. This is the ability to hear the sounds of a word and then SQUISH the sounds together to figure out the word. Kids love listening for sounds to figure out the mystery word. Watch the video to see this learning in action. https://youtu.be/COcWsHfOYM4

Talk It Up: Vocabulary

Use lots of action words as you make lunch or snacks! (E.g. slice, chop, rinse,stack, spread, prepare, wrap, squeeze, pack, refrigerate etc.)

Tuesday

This Year Reflection

Using a device or free printable like the example shown below, reflect on the school year that has passed. This can be completed as an audio recording, scribed or written independently. Reflect on your favourite moments and memories back at school or on a Google meet. Think about what you have learned and can take forward with you.

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Blending

Stretching Story. The Doghouse, Jan Thomas

Before listening to this funny story, pause the video on the front cover of the book to figure out some of the words you will hear in the story with sound blending. “We are going to listen to this story together, first I will stretch out the sounds of some of the words from the story and you will squish the sounds together to say the word.” k-i-ck (kick), b-a-ll (ball), b-i-g (big), c-ow (cow), m-ou-se (mouse), p-i-g (pig), c-a-ke (cake), d-u-ck (duck). Give your child a thumbs up when you hear one of the words in the story to model active listening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXNy-Bsvlzo

Wednesday

Read Aloud: Click on the link to listen to a read aloud of the picture book. The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds

Click on the link below to listen to a fun song with actions that go along with the book. 

The Dot Song Motions Guide - Emily Arrow & Peter H. Reynolds

Extension Activities:

Click on the link to watch how the author Peter Reynolds brings dots to life with his drawing how to video.

Ready Set Draw-ish! Peter H. Reynolds' THE DOT

Experiment and have fun using your imagination by creating your own pictures that start with just a dot

Reading With Your Ears: Sound Blending

I Spy Sound Blending Walk. While going for a walk, have your child squish sounds together to figure out what you are looking at. “I spy with my little eye a r-o-ck, what do I see?” (rock). Try these words: h-a-t (hat), sh-oe (shoe), l-ea-f (leaf), d-o-g (dog), f-e-n-ce (fence), t-r-ee (tree), s-u-n (sun), c-l-ou-d (cloud), c-a-t (cat).

Talk It Up! ‘Appy Wednesday

Question Sleuth Lite (free)

Compatible with: iPad

An interactive guessing game that provides practice asking and answering questions.  The Lite version of the game includes the categories: beach, animals, and cooking.  There is an option to create your own category by taking photos. 

Thursday

Making Words:

  • write letters on seperate pieces of paper or post-its

  • have your child move the letter cards around to make words

  • record each word in a table according to the number of letters in each word

Reading With Your Ears: Sound Blending

Stretching Story. The Very Hungry Bear by Nick Bland

Before listening to this rhyming story, pause the video on the front cover of the book to figure out some of the words you will hear in the story with sound blending. “We are going to listen to this story together, first I will stretch out the sounds of some of the words from the story and you will squish the sounds together to say the word.” r-o-ck (rock), f-oo-d (food), d-i-sh (dish), w-a-ve (wave), h-o-t (hot), f-i-sh (fish), i-ce (ice), s-n-ee-ze (sneeze), s-m-i-le (smile). Ask your child to give a thumbs up when they hear one of the words in the story to practice active listening. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1sSXgQ6g9aE

Friday

BAM GAME

This game can be played by 2-4 players. 

You will need:

  • Craft sticks – two per focus word, plus five additional sticks

  • Marker pen

  • Tin can or similar

Use the marker to write a focus word (sight words, rhyming words, etc.) on one end of each craft stick. Repeat until you have two sticks for each word. Write BAM! on the remaining five craft sticks. Place all sticks into the can so that the end with the word on it is hidden inside the can. 

Players take turns drawing a stick from the can. Players can either read the word on the stick, or quickly look at the word, cover it up, and then spell it without looking. If the player answers correctly, they keep the stick. If the player answers incorrectly, the stick is returned to the can.

If the player draws a BAM! stick, they must return all their sticks to the can.

Play continues until the time is called or a timer is set. The winner is the person with the most sticks in their possession when time is up


Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Blending

Squishing Categories.

Categories is one of my favourite games for language and literacy development. Today we will practice our sound blending and vocabulary skills at the same time. “I will say a colour word slowly and you squish the sounds together to say the word smooth and fast. What colour is this? r-e-d”(red).

Colours; p-i-n-k, b-l-a-ck, g-r-ee-n, b-l-ue, wh-i-te

Kitchen; c-u-p, kn-i-fe, p-l-a-te, ch-ai-r, p-o-t, s-p-oo-n

Numbers; t-wo, n-i-ne, f-i-ve, eigh-t, t-e-n, th-r-ee

Farm Animals; p-i-g, d-u-ck, sh-ee-p, c-ow, l-a-mb

Talk It Up! Vocabulary: Our Neighbour’s Dog

Each person takes a turn adding a new word to describe ‘the neighbour’s dog’ using a describing word/adjective. Keep going until someone has a hard time thinking of a new word to add or remembering the list of words. If your child gets stuck coming up with a describing word, use one of these prompts to give them an idea (e.g.  What does it do?, What size, shape, or color is it?, What parts does it have?, Where do you find it?). 

My neighbour’s dog is soft.

My neighbour’s dog is soft and has a long tail.

My neighbour’s dog is soft, has a long tail, and barks. 

Numeracy
Monday

(Optional) Weekly Challenge: Create your dream backyard.

Using flyers/pinterest, create a list of items you would like to add to your dream backyard. (eg. trampoline, trees, swimming pool, climber, etc.). Estimate the total cost of all your items.  Calculate the total cost of all of your items. 

Home Depot Flyer 

Outdoor Games & Toys For Kids

Walmart Summer  Flyer

https://www.toysrus.ca/en/toysrus/Category/Outdoor


Warm-Up (using coins):

Play a game of heads or tails. Ask your child(ren) to predict if the coin will land on heads or tails the most. Flip the coin and keep a tally of which side it lands on each time. Do this 20 times. See example below.

Numeracy Challenge: With your child(ren), create a collection of 100 items (lego, stones, books, coins, buttons, etc.).  Ask your child(ren) to sort their collection in a variety of ways (example: by colour, shape, size)

Extension: How many groups of 10 can you make with your collection? How many groups of 5? 2?

Tuesday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Have your child(ren) identify and describe various coins (i.e. nickel, dime, quarter, $1 coin, $2 coin), using actual coins, digital coins, or drawings. Have your child(ren) state their value.

Extension: Have your child(ren) identify $5, $10, $20, $50, $100 bills and their value.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Measurement Challenge: Have your child(ren) pick a coin, and using several of the same coins, measure various items around your home and record the lengths.

Extension: Use one coin to estimate the total length of each item before you measure it. 

Wednesday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Give your child(ren) 5-10 nickels, and ask your child(ren) to skip count by 5’s to determine the total value of the coins provided. Repeat with dimes (skip count by 10’s).

Extension: Use quarters and ask your child(ren) to skip count by 25’s.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Which One Doesn’t Belong? Have a conversation with your child(ren) about the image below and ask which one doesn’t belong? Ask your child(ren) to explain their reasoning about which shape they chose. (Eg. The hexagon doesn’t belong because it’s the only shape with more than 3 sides.)
Thursday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Using nickels, dimes and quarters, ask your child(ren) to show you how many different ways they can make 25 cents. 

Extension: Ask your child(ren) to show you how to make 75 cents, $1, $1.50, etc.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Patterning Challenge: Ask your child(ren) to create a pattern using 2 or more types of coins.
Friday

Fun Friday (Coding): Explore one of these coding websites with your child(ren):

Hour of code: https://hourofcode.com/ca

Erase all kittens: https://eraseallkittens.com/

Tynker: https://www.tynker.com/

Scratch Studio: https://scratch.mit.edu/studios/894964/
Fine Motor
Monday

Finger paint (use corn starch, food colouring and water for homemade finger paints). If using fingers is not a good idea, have your child paint a picture using Q-tips.

z

Take a piece of paper and using one hand, make it into a ball, then spread the paper back out flat.

Tuesday

Science experiment time! Line a pan with baking soda. Using pincer grasp (index finger and thumb) grasp an eye dropper and drip drops of vinegar onto baking soda, you could add some food colouring the vinegar.  If you don’t have an eye dropper try a turkey baster or a small spoon. 

Making fidget toys yourself offers countless fine motor benefits and the finished product offers benefits for kids who need to fidget to focus! Follow this link for ideas on how to make your own fidget toy.  DIY Fidget Toys
Wednesday

Water plants outdoors with a spray bottle.

Take a pair of scissors outdoors and cut nature by trimming around the yard. Just make sure your child knows which plants are okay to cut.

Thursday

Remember it is Father’s Day this Sunday. Here is an idea you could try. Find a stone and allow your child to decorate it with words or pictures. You could have them work on their ideas first on a piece of paper and then transfer their ideas to the stone of their choice.

Make a card for someone you love, the link below gives some creative card making ideas. Card Ideas

Friday

End the week off by doing some sidewalk chalk art. Here are some ideas if you are not sure what you could do.https://onelittleproject.com/sidewalk-chalk-ideas/

Bounce and catch a ball, try using both hands, one hand and then the other.

Physical Activity
Monday

Pillow Flipper

All you need here is a pillow to lay on the floor.

Set a timer for one minute. Complete five jumping jacks, flip the pillow, jump on and off the pillow to score a point. How many points can you score?

Next time through try to beat your score.

Extension: Each minute change the movement from jumping jacks to squats, burpees, mountain climbers, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOdkm4lCRJU 

Tuesday

Keep the Balloon Up

Supplement materials: If you do not have access to balloons, use tissue, ribbons, pillow cases, feathers, etc. 

Description of Activity: Make sure you have enough space in your home or outside. Prior to beginning the game, secure your lamps, pictures on the wall and anything which could break or fall. Simply blow up some balloons and tell your child/ren to keep the balloons from touching the floor. Have your child/ren pick music they would like to listen to during the activity.

Variations – This can be a game where the family can get “out”. Round up a few judges, and if a family member hits the balloon and it lands on the floor, they can then be considered “out”. Last family member standing wins!
Wednesday

Lesson: Roling, Counting, and Moving

View this video from the OPHEA website for a lesson on rolling, counting, and moving.

https://youtu.be/m6NGr90pZLQ 

Thursday

This or That Fitness

Play this fun video and choose between two options to discover a fitness move to complete.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcPDquffzMM

Friday

Jailhouse Rock Dance

The whole family will enjoy following along to this fun dance video. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbxDwaGwi2Q

Social Skills

Theme: Safety 

Skill: Making a Choice

Allow your child to choose which safety skill they would like to learn first (example: home address or parent’s telephone number).

Offer a choice in materials used to learn and practice the new skill (for example: if teaching a phone number, they could choose to write it out on a whiteboard or on paper, or by moving magnetic numbers around on a cookie sheet.) 

Tip! Providing your child with opportunities to make choices within the activity can help motivate and engage them even if the activity itself is not preferred. 

You can also offer a choice of a more preferred activity following the practice, such as “First we will practice our address, then you can choose what we do next.”

Theme: Safety

Skill: Joint Attention

While walking around your property, draw your child’s attention to unique features of your house or apartment (for example, “Look at the big rock in our garden with our house number!” or “Our balcony is really high, lets count how many floors up… you can see our umbrella from down here!”)  Have your child point out different features of the outside space around your house.

Extension activity: Work together to draw a picture of the outside of your living space from memory. Talk about the different features your child chooses to incorporate in their picture.

Tip! Try taking a photo with a phone or tablet so you can zoom in and/or touch the objects and details you’re showing your child.

Theme: Safety 

Skill: Turn Taking

Using pictures or toys, such as Little People figures, take turns labeling different community helpers and identifying their role (example: Who do you call when there is a fire? A firefighter!) 

Extension activity: 

Role playing safety conversations is a great way to practice necessary skills! Take turns playing the role of the community helper (ie. police officer) and practice what information your child would need to share with the police. 

Tip! By taking turns role playing, your child will get both a chance to see/hear you model what they should say as well as a chance to practice the skill for themselves.

Theme: Safety 

Skill: Communication

Practice responses to social questions that your child may be asked in the event of an emergency and separated from you.

Some examples include:

  • Name (first and last)

  • Address

  • Phone number

  • Age and/or birthdate

  • Parents’ name

  • School name

If your child uses a communication system, such as PECS or an augmentative communication  device, you may want to create a section to practice answering social questions. Or, consider creating a page with all emergency information and teach your child to open that page when asked social questions.

Tip! Be sure to practice asking the question in a variety of ways to ensure your child can answer the question if someone phrased it differently  in a real life situation. For example:

  • “Tell me your address.” 

  • “Where do you live?”

  • “Do you know your address?”

  • “Can you show me which is your house?”

Theme: Safety 

Skill: Leaving an activity

Children often find it difficult to  transition between activities, places and objects of attention. Being asked to stop one thing and start another is a very common trigger for challenging or risky behaviour. 

Set up opportunities to practice leaving an activity in a safe environment before eventually practicing in the community.

To help your child shift  their attention to something else, consider using words like “Pause”, “Change” or “Something different”.

Begin with practicing  the easiest transitions, and as your child shows success move toward more difficult transitions over time.

This could look like:

  1. Interrupting a non-preferred or neutral activity

  2. Transitioning from a somewhat preferred activity to a neutral activity

  3. Moving from a neutral activity to non-preferred activity

  4. Transitioning from a highly-preferred activity to a neutral activity.

If this is very challenging for your child, the other activity can be very brief. Allowing them to quickly return to the original activity reinforces their efforts. Remember to provide positive social praise for handling the change.

Tip! Outside of practice situations, try to avoid moving directly from your child’s most preferred to their least preferred activities. Nobody likes leaving something they love for something they dread. Can you switch the order (“First: pick up prescription; Then: Tim Horton’s Drive-Thru”) or transition to a neutral activity in between when you can’t control the order?

Don’t forget, honouring an appropriate request to leave a space or activity early is okay! Whenever possible it is best to end on a positive note and teach your child they can leave without having to resort to behaviours that may risk their and others’ safety.

Communication

Each week we are focusing on a different vocabulary word to help build your child’s communication skills.   

This week’s word is “TURN”. 

Activity Ideas: Here are some ideas to use the word “TURN” this week: 

Routines: Think about any machine around the house! Can you “turn” on the dishwasher, turn “off” the lights, watch the laundry “turn” in the dryer.?  If you have a chore schedule, talk about whose “turn” it is to sweep today! Try using the “sabotage” strategy in daily routines by “turning” clothes inside out, offering a cup upside down or deliberately going the wrong way, so you need to “turn” around. Set up more problem-solving activities like needing to “turn” a key to access a locked room or “turn” a screwdriver to replace dead batteries. 

Books: You are always “turning” pages in your books! When you are reading, stop at the end of a page and wait for your child to ask you to “turn” to the next page.   You can also sabotage with books – hand one to your child upside down, or start reading from the back of the book, then model “turn” to fix the problem!

Snacks/Meals: When cooking or snacking, you will need to open different containers. Talk about “turning” the lids when you open them. You can “turn” on different appliances in the kitchen or “turn” the spoon or spatula as you stir or flip things. Take “turns” mixing, stirring or putting items in the bowl/pan while cooking together. 

Outside: You can make “turns” on your bike, scooter, wagon etc. or have your child direct you when to “turn” and change directions if you are pulling or pushing them.  Even when walking you can point out “turns” that you make on your walk, or cars that are “turning”. If you go for a drive you will “turn” on the car , “turn” the key, and “turn” at intersections to go places!  

Games and Play: Use “turn” during games and activities - model my “turn” when you take a turn and your “turn” when giving the turn to your child.  If you have toys that turn (like wind-up toys or spinning tops) model as the toys “turn” or you “turn” their parts. Model using phrases like “turn it on” or “turn that up” when playing with toys, listening to music or watching videos. Allow your child to object to songs or shows that they don't like by saying “turn that off” or asking to “turn down” the volume.     

Partner Strategy: Try this strategy to support your child’s communication: 

Show, Don’t Tell 

The more you focus on “how” your child is communicating instead of “why” they are communicating, the less motivated they will be to engage with you. It is not beneficial to have your child “tell” you something, “find" or “say” a word, “give” a picture, “press” the button, or “use” their talker.  Similarly, “testing” your child by asking questions when you already know the answer does not expand their functional communication. 

Instead, focus on the connection you have with your child, or the fun in a family situation.  Tell jokes, share about your day, increase turn taking and extend your interaction.  Try to focus on making comments, describing things, and having your child ask questions.  Remember to model - show your child how to use the communication system during everyday activities, interact in ways that are fun and meaningful and provide opportunities for your child to communicate.   They will be more interested in meaningful exchanges with you than in responding to specific directions to “speak”.

For more information and examples explore the following:  

Explanation of Strategy: 

https://youtu.be/e0pUzJdWcBU 

https://bit.ly/2XQMXEU 

https://bit.ly/2Xszm82 

Video Examples using the word “turn”: 

Books: 

The Monster at the End of This Book:  https://youtu.be/wr-63JplwW0

Another Monster at the End of This Book:  https://youtu.be/0YiNT0hAEmo 

My Turn! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDhxxlWkFU0 

Songs: 

You Can Take a Turn and Then I’ll Get It Back:  https://youtu.be/LkfqHp3hATI 

Barney Take Turns; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_LeVeRVnV8 

Speech and Language Songs:  It’s My Turn:  https://youtu.be/JTUx4BgGd7g 

Ideas: 

WingsWorks “Turn”:  https://youtu.be/cPeWQDKQsGw 

ilovetobeanslp “Turn”:   https://youtu.be/QfoO0b6fyKg  

That Speech Lady:  https://youtu.be/OpvRfO1XRqg  

Two Headed Monster Takes Turns: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IeZvqQauWY 

For more specific information for your child, contact your child’s Speech Language Pathologist (ask your teacher if you need help).  Most of all, just spending time interacting and talking with your child will help to build their communication skills! 

June 8 - June 12
Printable PDF version
June 8 - June 12
Life Skills

*Please continue to provide opportunities to practice the life skills previously posted in the Week at Glance.

Bike Safety/Safe Walking

As the nicer weather is finally here, we will be able to get outside more often.  Some activities that you might get to enjoy more are going for walks and bike rides.  In order to do these things safely, there are a number of things that you can do.  It is important that we follow rules, and know what certain signs mean.  Please also review your own family rules, as well as safety rules with your child, before leaving the house. If your child(ren) is ready, teach bike signals and practice them!  It can be helpful to provide additional visuals to support these rules.  If possible, consider bringing a small set of signs/ symbols to reinforce safety rules (e.g., a lanyard with stop, walk, wait, etc.). Please remember to positively reinforce desired behaviour. 

Some rules to follow:

1. Always look both ways before you cross the street

2. Stop at all stop signs

3. Wait for the walk signal when crossing at a light

4. Wear a helmet when riding a bike

5. Walk your bike when crossing the street/ at an intersection

For more information on bike safety, please visit

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/bicycle-safety.shtml

Oral Language and Literacy
Monday

Barrier Game:

Can you use words to create a clear picture in your partner’s mind?

Materials:

- 2 identical sets of lego or other items that can be used for building

- A barrier to block your structure from view (e.g., binder, cereal box, etc.)

How to Play:

-        Partner 1 will create a structure behind a  barrier (so partner 2 can’t see it).

-        Partner 1 will use descriptive words and location words to describe the structure.

Descriptive Words

Location Words

colours (red, blue, etc.), size (big, small, etc.)

texture (smooth, bumpy, etc.),

on top of, bottom,  beside, in between, under, above, next to, underneath, to the left of, to the right of, etc.

 

-        Partner 2 will try to create the same structure based on the description of Partner 1.

-        Remove the barrier to see how close you came to creating the same structure

-        Take turns being the talker and the builder

Reading With Your Ears:

Middle Sound Identification

Middle sound identification is the ability to hear and isolate the middle sound in a word and is an important skill for reading and spelling. Watch the video to see how we can use fun learning tools at home to pause and hear those tricky vowels in the middle.

https://youtu.be/_TbjYvTacFg 

Talk It Up! Vocabulary

Go for a walk in the neighbourhood and read the signs you see. Talk about what the signs mean.

Tuesday

Word Family Game

Word families are words that rhyme. Teaching word families helps students see patterns in text and encourages them to begin reading by grouping sets of letters within a word. A fun way learn this is by playing a game using a white board or scrap piece of paper Write a list of words on the left-hand side of the whiteboard or paper (i.e. hat, mat, mop, top, etc.) and then a second list of words that rhyme with them on the right-hand side (you could even try using a theme for the words). Another variation of this game could be to write 2 lists of words and have the student draw a line to link the words from the wordleft, to the rhyming word on the right-hand side. Not only is this a fun activity to help students learn about word families, it also helps develop their fine motor skills.

Reading With Your Ears:

Middle Sound Identification

Say It, Chop It, Hear the Middle. Keep practicing your ability to hear the middle sound in words. Say a word from the list below. Ask your child to repeat the word and use learning tools (e.g., Lego, buttons) to chop up the sounds in words. Point to the middle object and say, “tell me the middle sound”. Try these words: peek (ee), bed (e), mop (o), hat (a), sun (u).

Talk It Up! Stories

Look at the cover of a book and talk about what you see. Talk about the title. Can you guess what the story is about from the cover?
Wednesday

Story Stones

When outside, collect some small sized stones that you can paint or draw on. Using paint, coloured markers and liquid paper for white, draw simple pictures such as things you from nature like animals, flowers, etc. Use these rocks as story prompts and take turns telling short stories.  

Reading With Your Ears:

Middle Sound Identification

Middle Macaroni. Today we will use 3 pieces of macaroni (or other small objects) to practice identifying the middle sound in a word. Choose a word from the list below and say it. Ask your child to say the word and use the macaroni to chop up the sounds. Point to the middle piece of macaroni and say, “tell me the middle sound”. Try these words: rat (a), duck (u), ship (i), cap (a), kid (i), boat (oa).

Talk It Up! ‘Appy Wednesday!

Story Creator, Compatible with: iPhone, iPad (Free)

A story creation app where children can make their own story books using photos, videos, text, and audio.  This app is easy to use and allows children to turn their personal adventures (e.g., a walk through the woods or a tea party with stuffed animals) into a story.  Parents can model story making by first telling the story to their child and then encouraging their child to tell the same story using the pictures as a guide. Encourage them to use detail in their descriptions! Promote learning of new daily living skills by taking pictures of the steps needed to complete a sequential task (e.g., making a sandwich, completing a tidy up routine).  Then, have your child put the pictures in the correct order. Text can be added and the sequence can be narrated aloud and recorded. Share your stories with family members, friends, or educators!

Thursday

Letter Writing:

Using a device or pencil and paper, write a friendly letter to a family member or friend. It can be someone that your child is missing. Include a greeting, body and closing. See the video below to review the basics. You can send it through technology or in the mail. Include colour, images or drawings. This activity can be done at varying levels with an adult scribing or the participant writing a letter with several paragraphs.

How To Write a Friendly Letter

Reading With Your Ears:

Middle Sound Identification

Hop the Middle Sound. Hop each sound in a word from the list below with your child and then work together to hear the middle sound in the word. You may need to hop the word a few times, prolong and/or pause on the middle sound (e.g., “b-aaaaa-t”). Hop these words: net (e), lock (o), chain (ai), tooth (oo), rake (a).

Talk It Up! Vocabulary

Play Categories. One player selects a “category” and the other players take turns naming items that belong in that group. The category can be as broad as “animals,” or as narrow as “types of dogs.”The category chosen determines how difficult or easy the game is. Players can not repeat an item that has already been said. The game continues until players run out of ideas for the category.

Category Suggestions: Easier; Television shows, sports, flowers. Challenge: Comedy shows, cooking shows, cartoon characters, Basketball teams, sports played inside/outside, Sports at Summer Olympics,  types of trees.

Friday

Cook Tray Writing:

You will need a cookie tray and your choice of

item to fill the tray with. You can use rice, sand, sugar, sprinkles, fruit drink powder, gel, shaving cream, pudding etc. If you are concerned your child may eat the writing medium - use something safe for eating. Your child can practice printing letters and sounds, their name, words and even cursive. You can include cards with the tray. This activity can be modified to a variety of learning levels.

Reading With Your Ears:

Middle Sound Identification

What Pet Should I Get? by Dr. Seuss. Tell your child you are going to listen to the story by Dr. Seuss pausing the story every few pages (or at the end of the book) to hear the middle sound for some of the words in the story. Continue to use learning tools to help your child if needed. Here are some words from the story to get you started; pet(e), get(e), shop(o), took(oo), shook(oo), cat(a), pat(a), pick(i), home(o), pup(u), soon(oo), noon(oo), fish(i), head(ea), fun(u), not(o), big(i), full(u), mad(a).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psCzO1TlJlU

Talk It Up! Vocabulary: Our Neighbour’s Car

Each person takes a turn adding a new word to describe ‘the neighbour’s car’ using a describing word/adjective. Keep going until someone has a hard time thinking of a new word to add or remembering the list of words. If your child gets stuck coming up with a describing word, use one of these prompts to give them an idea (e.g.  What does it do?, What size, shape, or color is it?, What parts does it have?, Where do you find it?).

My neighbour’s car is shiny.

My neighbour’s car is shiny and has 4 wheels.

My neighbour’s car is shiny, has 4 wheels, and is red.

Numeracy
Monday

(Optional) Weekly Challenge:  Amusement Park Project:

Create a chart of how much you would charge for gate entrance, food, drinks, games, souvenirs, etc.

Extension: If 100 people came into the gates and each person played 3 games, how much money would you earn in the day? What if it cost $1000 a day to run the park? How much would you earn then?

Warm up: (using dice): Collect 2 dice. Have your child(ren) roll the dice and ask them how many dots they see. Challenge them to tell you how many dots they see without counting one by on.

Link to online dice: https://www.online-stopwatch.com/chance-games/roll-a-dice/

Probability Challenge: Magic Dice

Provide your child(ren) with dice, a ten frame and 10 coins (or buttons, rocks etc.).

Pick a number between 1-6. This will be your magic number. Take turns rolling the dice with your child(ren). Each time the magic number is rolled, a coin (or other counter) is placed on the ten frame. Continue rolling the dice until the ten frame is filled only with the magic number. The person to fill their frame with their magic number the fastest wins. 

Ten Frame Template 

Extension: Use a timer to see how long it takes to fill the ten frames. Can you beat your time?

Tuesday

Warm up: (using dice): Collect 2 dice (or more dice to make activity more challenging). Have your child(ren) roll the dice and ask them which number is bigger.

Extension: If using more than two dice, have your child(ren) organize the dice from lowest to greatest number or vice versa.

Link to online dice: https://www.online-stopwatch.com/chance-games/roll-a-dice/

Number of the Day Challenge: Choose a single digit number (1-9) to complete the challenge attached.

Number of the Day printable

Extension: Choose a double or triple digit number (example: 62 or 387) to complete the challenge.
Wednesday

Warm up: (using dice): Collect 2 dice.(or more dice to make activity more challenging). Have your child(ren) roll the dice and ask them how many dots they see all together (5 dots plus 3 dots equals 8 dots) 

Link to online dice: https://www.online-stopwatch.com/chance-games/roll-a-dice/

Geometry Challenge: Build it with Sticks

You can use two short sticks and two long sticks to build a rectangle. You can use sticks that you find in the yard or while out on a walk with your child(ren) to complete this activity.

What other shapes can you make from these four sticks? Give each of your shapes a name.

Extension: Challenge your child(ren) to build a 3D shape using sticks. What materials could they use to hold the sticks together?

Thursday

Warm up: (using dice): Collect 2 dice.(or more dice to make activity more challenging). Have your child(ren) roll the dice and ask them to identify which number is bigger. Then have them subtract the smaller number from the bigger number (example: 5 dots take away 2 dots equals 3 dots) 

Link to online dice: https://www.online-stopwatch.com/chance-games/roll-a-dice/

Numeracy Challenge: Grocery List

Use an online grocery flyer and ask your child(ren) to help create a grocery list of items they would like to purchase. Add the cost of each item beside and have your child(ren) estimate the total cost. Using a calculator or other math tool, have your child(ren) calculate the total cost.

Extension:  Provide your child(ren) with a budget (eg. $50.00) for their grocery shopping list and have them create another list while staying within budget.

https://www.yourindependentgrocer.ca/print-flyer?navid=flyer-deal

https://www.foodbasics.ca/flyer.en.html

https://www.walmart.ca/flyer

Friday

Fun Friday!

Play a game as a family.

Link to Board Game Suggestions

Fine Motor
Monday

Make a spider using pipe cleaners (or twist ties). Tie some yarn to the spider and hold it up. Instruct your child to cut the yarn at the top. Have fun with it by being enthusiastic when the spider falls or maybe even sing Itsy Bitsy Spider. Have them do it over and over until they cannot cut anymore yarn.

Push fingers against a mattress, like a finger pushup. How many can you do?
Tuesday

Make a popsicle stick puzzle. Take a picture from a magazine or print one off of the internet and glue it onto popsicle sticks. Once dry, have your child cut to separate each stick. They can mix up the sticks and put the picture puzzle together over and over again.

Cut through objects of different strengths such as clay, tin foil, felt, or thick paper. Make different designs such as zig zags or curly lines.

Wednesday

Cut things up in the kitchen, depending on age and ability have your child cut vegetables, or cut a sandwich in half. Try cutting a pancake using a fork and knife.

Make a geoboard using a piece of flat board and nails. Space the nails along the board at equal distances apart. Once done, use elastics to make shapes. An older student could create it themselves and even make a maze using the geoboard.
Thursday

Stick pieces of masking tape onto a container lid or other surface and have your child peel them off.

Use masking tape to make your child’s name on a blank piece of paper. Once their name is taped on they can colour over the whole paper with whatever design they would like. Allow it to dry, then carefully peel the masking tape off of the paper.
Friday

Bake with your child. Have them knead the bread, stir the cake batter, or spoon out the cookie dough onto the baking sheet.

Play with playdough, roll playdough into balls and snakes. Once done rolling they could decorate the snake or just have fun with the playdough.

Physical Activity 
Monday

Bean Bag Toss

This super simple activity is great for kids of all different ages and abilities as you can easily make it more or less challenging. Set up two baskets, one full of beanbags or soft balls, (you could also use a rolled up sock). Your child can practice throwing a beanbag from one basket to another to work on coordination. Move the baskets further apart as they get the hang of it.

Click on the link below for additional information:

https://www.mother.ly/child/physical-education-activities-at-home
Tuesday

Paper Ladder Workout

All you need for this activity is four pieces of paper laid out on the floor. Spread them out equal distance apart.

  1. Run sideways, one step per square
  2. In and out. Alternate running inside, outside between the papers
  3. Hop on one foot
  4. Switch feet and continue with different movements. Challenge yourself to get your heart pumping.

Here is a video link to follow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xr2SiABUnM8
Wednesday

Lesson: In, Out, On

View this video from the OPHEA website for a lesson on moving safely in a variety of ways while using different speeds, pathways, directions, and levels.

https://youtu.be/G4uJaRxgMp8

Thursday

Koo Koo Kangaroo - Ninja Training - Dance Along

Have fun with this dance!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b4u42yQmvpI

Friday

Physical Activities with “Joe”

If you’re ready to get your heart pumping, follow along to this 30 minute workout video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGKGNzNbWjU&list=PLyCLoPd4VxBvQafyve889qVcPxYEjdSTl&index=6&t=0s

Social Skills
Monday

Theme of the Week: Colouring/Drawing

Skill: Making a Choice 

Offer a choice of which paper, colouring book, or page in a colouring book they would like to use. You can also support your child’s choice-making skills by having them choose between different colours or different writing utensils (i.e., markers vs. crayons).

Provide some choices or ideas of different things your child could draw (i.e., fictional characters, animals, favorite items/activities, etc.) 

Tip! If your child is a reluctant artist, you may have more success introducing this leisure skill if you start with colouring pages or drawings related to items of high interest. For example, colouring Paw Patrol colouring sheets or drawing items or characters from harry Potter.
Tuesday

Skill: Joint Attention

While your child is drawing or colouring, talk about their creation. Guess what it might be or talk about the colours they chose to use.

You can also draw alongside your child and encourage them to look at what you are doing. You can point out any similarities or differences between your creations. This activity may be more successful if you draw or colour something similarly- themed to your child. 

Extension activity: While outside exploring the yard or a nearby path, examine different materials that could be collected and used to draw on (Example: Rocks, leaves…). Talk about/ touch the different textures (rough/smooth) and have your child see which would be best for drawing on.

Tip! While being creative with your child, it can help to draw their attention to specific attributes of your artwork if you use gestures alongside your verbal narrations. For example, while guessing what your child might be drawing, point to the specific part of the picture you are referring to. 

Wednesday

Skill: Turn Taking 

If you have more than one child you could have them practice taking turns while colouring by having them work collaboratively on one colouring page or poster.  Have them take turns colouring a section or part of the project. 

You could also have your children brainstorm ideas for a mural or large poster based on a story you’ve read or activity you’ve done together and then have them take turns contributing to the masterpiece!

Tip! You can further promote turn-taking by setting up the environment to only have one of each colour. This should naturally encourage waiting and turn-taking skills as your children share colouring utensils.

The above suggestions can also be practiced with a parent/guardian if siblings are not available!

Thursday 

Skill: Communication

Requesting: You can encourage requesting by holding up two different colours and having your child ask for one. You can use the same strategy for different colouring books or art paper. Depending on your child’s communication abilities, you may also be able to ask them, “What colours would you like me to get out?” as a prompt for them to request desired colours/items.

Labeling: While your child is drawing, point out parts of their creation and ask them, “Hey cool,  what’s that?” You can push them even further by having them label aspects of your own creation which might be more novel. 

Conversation: While colouring or drawing with your child, ask them specific questions about their creation.  You could also practice reciprocating asking and answering questions with your child by setting a goal at the onset of the activity. For example, try to each ask 3 questions about each other's work.  You can use small counters or tally marks on a paper to identify each time one of you asks a question. 

Tip! Please keep in mind that the way your child asks for, labels or talks about items may be done using gestures, picture symbols, sign language, a communication device or vocally.

If your child sometimes struggles to use their specific communication system to ask for things, you can prompt them to do so and then praise them for asking you nicely. 

Remember to be aware of what communication skills your child can do independently and which ones are still emerging. If you are asking them to label items or answer questions and you are unsure whether or not they know how to answer, provide them with a prompt/help to avoid frustration. This may involve simply modeling the response for them. 

Friday

Skill: Leaving an Activity 

If colouring/drawing is a highly preferred activity for your child, leaving them to move on with your daily routine may be challenging.  Here are a  few strategies to promote successful transitions away from colouring and hopefully end the activity on a positive note:

-Use a visual timer to help your child see how long they have to colour/draw

-Set out a specific number of colouring sheets so they can see how many they get to do before moving on with the schedule

-Only put out the exact materials required to complete the colouring/drawing projects you have time for

-Prime/remind your child often as to when the activity will be coming to an end

-Try to arrange your daily schedule so that your children are not going from their most favorite activity to their least favorite. You can do this by tossing a “buffer” in between to help ease the stress of the transition. For example, if colouring is a favorite and eating a meal is not, have them do something neutral in between such as, washing their hands.

Tip! Remember, if your child does leave colouring/drawing or ANY activity with ease, provide ample praise and encouragement!

 
Communication

Each week we are focusing on a different vocabulary word to help build your child’s communication skills.  

This week’s words are “OPEN” and “HELP”.

Activity Ideas:  Here are some ideas to use “OPEN” and “HELP” this week:

Routines:  “Open” and “help” are great words to model in a variety of daily routines! You can “open” drawers, containers, windows, refrigerators, ovens, books, bottles, etc.  Create opportunities for your child to ask for “help” during morning, evening and daily routines (e.g. not providing all the tools that your child needs, using clothes with ties, zippers, buttons etc.)

Books: Any book can be used to model the word “open”! Lift the flap books provide many opportunities for you to “open” each flap and “see” what is inside.

Snacks/Meals:  Hand your child their favorite food in a difficult-to-open container and prompt them to direct you to “open” it, or to ask you for “help”.  Your child can also use the words “open”, “close” and “help” for the refrigerator, cupboards, pantry or dishwasher. Model the word “open” when using a can opener and “close” when sealing food items.

Outside: Going outside to play is a great time for your child to use the word “open” (Open the door!). When you go for a ride in the car, talk about “opening” and “closing” the car doors, windows, glove compartments and even the AC vents.  Your child may need “help” with their seatbelt.

Games and Play: Have fun making silly faces by letting your child direct you to “open” and “close” your eyes, nose and mouth. Play games that need things to be built or assembled as your child may need you to “help” them put the pieces together. 

Partner Strategy:  Try this strategy to support your child’s communication: 

Hard to Open/Hard to Operate: 

Previous strategies of “wait”, “sabotage” and “bit by bit” are all examples of “communicative temptations” - ways of changing a familiar activity/routine in order to create new/different situations in which your child is tempted to communicate. 

You can also “tempt” your child to communicate by giving them an item which is either unfamiliar or difficult for them to operate without help (e.g. wind-up toys, bubbles with a tightly closed lid). Model how to use the item or present the item to your child and wait - because the item is hard to operate your child will be more likely to need to communicate in order to request assistance.  

Additionally, you could present a preferred item in a clear, but difficult to open container, again, providing a “temptation” for your child to communicate. A variety of responses are acceptable, including eye gaze (e.g. looking at you), gestures (e.g. pointing, reaching, taking your hand), sounds, and/or words.  This gives you an opportunity to model what they “would” say if they could (e.g. “open”, “help”), and then to respond quickly to reinforce their communication attempt. If your child doesn’t respond, you can try “tempting” your child again, or repeat your model and continue playing with them. 

For more information and examples explore the following: 

Explanation of Strategy:

https://youtu.be/XSAxjq_6mQA

Video Examples using the words “open” and “help”:

Books:

Dear Zoo:  https://youtu.be/ZnHh8Dj6P-M

Where’s Spot?:  https://youtu.be/vaUBhayM_bA

Rachel Sauve – The Little Red Hen: https://youtu.be/3JAXum1mIQI

Runkle SLP, using Tobii Dynavox Book “Dinner”:  https://youtu.be/F8ezefvdDog

Songs:

Open Them Shut Them:  https://youtu.be/DzA1VQL1oME

Sight Word Song:  https://youtu.be/UurqMrCD28k

Speech and Language Songs:  “I Need Help”  https://youtu.be/Wcv6VpWleWg

Little People Songs – The Help Song:  https://youtu.be/cWV3B4DxOy8

Ideas:

I am Boundless (Open and Close):  https://youtu.be/Ewmoh1H6BNM 

That Speech Lady (Open):  https://youtu.be/nOpW7t1H-P8 

WingsWorks (Help):  https://youtu.be/H65k43cC8Zg

Explore AAC /Saltillo  (Help):  https://youtu.be/urvpbflQM4Q

For more specific information for your child, contact your child’s Speech Language Pathologist (ask your teacher if you need help).  Most of all, just spending time interacting and talking with your child will help to build their communication skills.

June 1 - June 5
Printable PDF version
June 1 - June 5
Life Skills

*Please continue to provide opportunities to practice the life skills previously posted in the Week at Glance. 

Making the bed and tidying the bedroom

Making the bed in the morning and tidying a room are positive habits to have. Establishing routines is a good way to help form habits and ensure a higher likelihood that these habits will stick. Making the bed each morning is a good routine to begin the day. As parents ourselves, we recognize that sometimes our child(ren) lack motivation to keep their room tidy and make the bed.  Using positive reinforcement often can help make this task less daunting.  Consider using first and then language with your child (ex. “First make your bed and then you get a sticker”).  Visuals are also a great way to make this task easier for our child(ren) as they help us remember things and remind us to stay on track. Whether the visual is part of a schedule or a simple image that will be easily seen, consider using one to help establish this as a part of the daily routine. Remember if your child can read, a list is a simple visual that can be used.

Oral Language and Literacy
Monday

Print Hunt

Send your child on a hunt to find print around your home or outdoors. They can record it on a chart or take photos with an iPhone or iPad. This activity can be played at many levels of learning:

  • Search for letters or begining sounds

  • Search for early words 

  • Higher level vocabulary

  • Words in a  theme like spring words, print in our environment like signs,  opposites, homophones, compound words. You can make the theme as simple or complicated. 

  • Choose a theme of your child’s interests

Reading AND Spelling With Your Ears.

Say It, Tap It, Spell It!

This week we will use your child’s ability to segment or chop up the sounds in words to now print letters to spell the words. Watch the ‘Say It, Tap It, Spell It’ learning routine in action here.

https://youtu.be/O4pb-EQuW6A. Find a copy of the activity sheet on the Speech and Language website. https://sites.google.com/gotvdsb.ca/tvdsbspeechlanguageservices/early-literacy/phonological-awareness/pa-for-reading-spelling

 

Talk It Up! Bathroom

One of the easiest ways to support language development is to infuse language concepts into everyday conversation.

ACTIONS: wash, scrub, splash, lather, rinse, pour, drip, brush, gargle, plunge, comb, flush

OPPOSITES: hot/cold, wet/dry, clean/dirty, sink/float, rough/smooth, full/empty

FOLLOW DIRECTIONS: put your pyjamas on, pour the bubble bath in the tub, hang up your towel, put toothpaste on your toothbrush

LABELLING: shampoo, soap, sponge, towel, suds, drain, hairdryer, plunger, mirror, shower curtain, faucet

Tuesday

Kahoot!

Download the Kahoot! app on a device and begin to play. Kahoot! is a game-based learning platform, used as educational technology in schools and other educational institutions. Its learning games are user-generated multiple-choice quizzes that can be accessed via a web browser or the Kahoot app. Your child can even create their own games and share with family and friends. It is easy to use and fun to play for all ages.

Reading AND Spelling With Your Ears!

More ‘Say It, Tap It, Spell It’

Have fun tapping out the sounds in these words and then printing the letters to spell the words. 

Level 1: at (a-t), map (m-a-p), sit (s-i-t), ten (t-e-n), hot (h-o-t); Level 2: dash (d-a-sh), chip (ch-i-p), moth (m-o-th); Level 3: spot (s-p-o-t), brag (b-r-a-g), cloud (c-l-ou-d), flag (f-l-a-g)

Wednesday

Vocabulary Builder:

Build your child’s vocabulary around specific topics by playing “Guess the Topic.” In this game you and your child take turns coming up with a list of 3-5 words that are related to a single topic. Take turns reading your list of words and see if the other person can guess the topic. (Hint: have some extra words ready in case they need more clues). You can make this as easy or challenging as you want depending on your child’s skill level. 

Examples: 

  • bat, diamond, homerun (baseball)

  • buzz, sting, pollinate (bee)

erupt, lava, smoke, dormant (volcano)

Reading AND Spelling With Your Ears!

Say It, Tap It, Spell It with Post It Notes! 

  1. Have your child repeat one of the words below.

  2. Tap each sound in the word on a separate Post It note (or little piece of paper).

  3. Print the letter or letters for each sound to spell the word. 

Level 1: up (u-p), sad (s-a-d), fit (f-i-t), mop (m-o-p), pen (p-e-n); Level 2: dish (d-i-sh), path (p-a-th), shut (sh-u-t), with (w-i-th); Level 3: spit (s-p-i-t), grip (g-r-i-p), broom (b-r-oo-m), truck (t-r-u-ck)

 

Talk It Up! ‘Appy Wednesday

Let’s Name Things Fun Deck (Free)

Compatible with: iPhone, iPad

An app that builds vocabulary, reasoning and categorization skills. Take turns selecting a card and naming as many items within a given category as you can think of (e.g., Name things you would take on a trip).

Thursday

Listen to Reading:

Click on the link below to listen to author Dennis Mathew read aloud his book Bello the Cello!

Read Out Loud BELLO THE CELLO


Extension Activities:

Discuss with your child how Bello felt when he finally found his song.

Discuss with your child what makes them special and unique.

Have your child make a list of all the things they CAN do. Use the sentence stem, I can …

Have your child draw a picture and write a sentence about their own special talent (what they CAN do) using the sentence stem: My special talent is ... If they are stuck, point out some special things that they do (e.g., playing basketball, being a good sibling, making others smile, etc.)

Reading AND Spelling With Your Ears

Say It, Chop It, Spell It with Chalk. Today we will use rocks and chalk outside to practice the literacy skill of sound segmenting and spelling words. Select a word from the list below. Have your child repeat the word, chop up the sounds with the rocks, and then use chalk to spell the words. 

Level 1: sat (s-a-t), tap (t-a-p), dog (d-o-g), let (l-e-t), bug (b-u-g); Level 2: shop (sh-o-p), bath (b-a-th), chat (ch-a-t), shin (sh-i-n); Level 3: list (l-i-s-t), spoon (s-p-oo-n), jump (j-u-m-p), snip (s-n-i-p) 

Friday

Would You Rather?

Cut out strips of paper and have your child write Would You Rather questions on them (if writing is challenging you can scribe the sentences for them). Fold the paper strips in half and place them in a bowl. Take turns pulling out a would you rather question and reading it out loud to your family. Have fun listening to how each person in your family answers the questions. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Would you rather live in a tree house or a cave?

  • Would you rather be able to fly or be invisible?

  • Would you rather never be allowed to eat meat or never allowed to eat vegetables?

  • Would you rather be a famous painter or a brilliant mathematician?  

Remember to have fun and be creative!!

Reading AND Spelling With Your Ears

Say It, Jump It, Spell It with Hula Hoops. Today we will use hula hoops (or circles drawn on the pavement) and chalk to practice the literacy skill of sound segmenting and spelling words. Select a word from the list below. Have your child repeat the word, jump in a hula hoop for each sound in the word, then use the chalk to spell the words. 

Level 1: pat (p-a-t), sap (s-a-p), top (t-o-p), get (g-e-t), tub (t-u-b); Level 2: fish (f-i-sh), chop (ch-o-p), shed (sh-e-d), both (b-o-th); Level 3: slip (s-l-i-p), lamp (l-a-m-p), stick (s-t-i-ck), frog (f-r-o-g)

Talk It Up! Vocabulary: Our Neighbour’s Cat

Each person takes a turn adding a new word to describe ‘the neighbour’s cat’ using a describing word/adjective. Keep going until someone has a hard time thinking of a new word to add or remembering the list of words. If your child gets stuck coming up with a describing word, use one of these prompts to give them an idea (e.g.  What does it do?, What size, shape, or color is it?, What parts does it have?, Where do you find it?). 

My neighbour’s cat is playful.

My neighbour’s cat is playful and has stripes.

My neighbour’s cat is playful, has stripes, and feels soft. 

Numeracy
Monday

(Optional) Weekly Challenge:  Amusement Park Project: 

Using your brainstorming ideas from last week, design the layout of your amusement park including rides, washrooms, food stands, walkways, entrances, etc. to scale using a piece of grid paper.

Extension:  Measure out the area & perimeter of the park.

Link to printable grid paper:

https://www.hand2mind.com/pdf/gridpaper.pdf

Warm-Up (using June Calendar): Using buttons, blocks, coins, etc. Have your child(ren) put an object on all of the numbers they would say if they were counting by 10’s (10, 20, 30), repeat the activity counting by 5’s and then 2’s.

Link to June calendar:

https://print-a-calendar.com/june-2020

Tuesday

Warm-Up (using June Calendar): Toss a small stone, button, cube, etc. onto the calendar.  Have your child(ren) identify the number that the object landed on.

Extension: Have them count backwards from that number, back to one.

Link to June calendar:

https://print-a-calendar.com/june-2020


Read Aloud Challenge:

Listen to “How Much, How Many, How Far, How Heavy, How Long, How Tall Is 1000?”  By Helen Nolan 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJZEEAimJlo

Draw a picture of something that would represent approximately 1000.

Extension: Draw a picture of two or more items that would add up to approximately 1000.

Wednesday

Warm-Up (using June calendar): Have your child(ren) place a button, coin, etc. on all of the even numbers on the calendar (even numbers can be divided evenly by 2. Example: 2, 4, 6).

Link to June calendar:

https://print-a-calendar.com/june-2020

Measurement Challenge: One of these glasses is tall and skinny. The other is short and fat.

Which of these two glasses would you choose if you wanted the one that holds the most liquid? Discuss your results. 


Extension: Use three or more glasses  to determine which holds the most liquid.
Thursday 

Warm-Up (using June calendar): Have your child(ren) count how many days are left in June. Repeat activity daily if you would like. 

Link to June calendar:

https://print-a-calendar.com/june-2020

Patterning Challenge:

A pattern could start at 7 and increase by 5 each term. What are the next three numbers?

Extension: A pattern could start at 7 and increase by 13 (or a number of your child(ren)’s choice). What would the next three numbers be?

Friday

Fun Friday (Coding): Explore one of these coding websites with your child(ren):

Hour of code: https://hourofcode.com/ca

Erase all kittens: https://eraseallkittens.com/

Tynker: https://www.tynker.com/

Scratch Studio: https://scratch.mit.edu/studios/894964/
Fine Motor
Monday

Take a used tissue box, punch some holes in it as if it were a shoe (your child could punch the holes in if able) and have them thread either a shoe string or yarn through it. Finish it off by tying a knot.

Ask your child to use just the tripod fingers (thumb, index and middle fingers) to walk a ball up and down their leg.

Tuesday

Picking up a die with the thumb and index finger is great fine motor practice. Have some fun with your child playing a dice game. Here is a website for you to get some different ideas. https://icebreakerideas.com/dice-games/

Using a spray bottle and paper towel or cloth wash a window or mirror.  You can also play outside with water in a spray bottle, spray the deck, driveway or sidewalk to make a design.

Wednesday

Here is a more challenging, yet potentially memorable activity you could do with your child (an older teen will love it). Make some popsicle stick weaves and watch them fly apart. Follow the link below for a step-by-step guide. https://www.instructables.com/id/Cobra-Weave-Exploding-Stick-Bomb/

Spin a pen or pencil on a tabletop using the index finger and thumb, trying spinning it the other way, now try with the other hand.

Thursday

Here is a fun activity for those golfing families. Take some foam or sponge and line up some golf tees. Have your child place marbles, dried beans, or other small items on top of each tee.

Rock, Paper, Scissors Game: The rules are – Rock smashes Scissors – Scissors Cut Paper – Paper covers Rock. On the count of three, you put out your hand as a rock (fist), scissors (two fingers open) or paper (hand flat) and then determine a winner. It can be one and done or best out of 3 trials.

Friday

Marshmallows and toothpicks building activity.  Connect toothpicks with marshmallows to create a structure.

Writing and drawing using different writing tools, markers, crayons, paint, pencil, pen.

Physical Activity
Monday

Lesson: Net and Wall Games

View this video from the OPHEA website for a lesson on net and wall games.

Extension: Participate in the additional  lessons and activity games for this unit throughout the week.

https://teachingtools.ophea.net/lesson-plans/hpe-home/unit-2-netwall-games/week-1-lesson-1-introduction-net-wall-games

Tech Tip!

Reader View for iPads- if there are lines on the address bar or AA- click on it and the article that you are reading will show up-no ads

Tuesday

Sponge Bullseye

With the hot weather, this one will be a fun activity!

Once you’ve found an open space in your neighbourhood, like your driveway or the sidewalk, it’s time for a game of sponge bullseye. After all, everyone loves an excuse to get wet and messy outside.

  • First, draw a target on the floor with some coloured chalk. Make sure to draw a series of concentric circles, so that the target has different scoring zones.

  • Once you’ve gathered a team, take turns with your family  to dip a sponge in a bucket of water.

  • Then throw the sponges at the target — aim for the middle to get more points.

  • Why not change the distances you start from, or your throwing technique for an extra challenge?

  • Don’t forget to keep a running total of your scores.

  • So wherever and however you want to play, there are always ways to have outside fun. 

https://outdoorclassroomday.com/resource/sponge-bullseye/

Tech Tip!

After May 6, 2020-The Control Centre is found in the top right hand corner, swipe down from there.

Wednesday

Coin Flip Craze Workout

All you need for this six minute workout is a coin. Toss the coin, and do the corresponding movement depending on whether it lands on heads or tails.
https://peuniverse.com/video/coin-flip-craze/

Tech Tip!

Use the Keyboard shortcut CTRL + A= to select all

Thursday

Dino Stomp

Follow the video to learn the Dino Stomp. Have fun!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Imhi98dHa5w

Banana Banana Meatball

Patterns are everywhere. Dance and sing with Blazer Fresh!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ9q4U2P3ig

Tech Tip:

Want to set time limits for screen time?  Go to settings> Screen Time to set time limits for specific apps.
Friday

Yoga Break - Growth Mindset

Participate in a growth mindset yoga class! Focus on balancing skills through fun postures like Pirate Pose, and learn how to keep trying, even when it’s hard.

https://youtu.be/urX6QtM_1RQ

Tech Tip:

Set a timer on the iPad to help monitor activities! Select and touch the timer icon to set.
Social Skills
Monday

Theme of the Week: Playing with/Learning about Animals

 

Skill: Making a Choice

Offer a choice to your child of what types of animals they want to explore or research today. For example: Pets, Jungle Animals,or Sea Creatures. 

You can also offer a choice of reading about them together, labeling toy animals or live pets, or watching a video from one of the many zoos that are offering virtual tours these days.

If your child is interested in doing more, you could then offer a choice of drawing the animal you learned about, making a PowerPoint presentation about the animal,or telling somebody else a fact they learned about the animal.

Below is a template that could be used when researching an animal as well as some websites to help your child complete their research! 

Animal research form

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/

https://kids.sandiegozoo.org/

Tip! Making a choice can be done using forced choice (giving your child two options to choose from, using words, pictures, or text, and asking them to “Pick one,” or “Horses or Sharks?”) or free operant (open-ended questions such as “ What animal do you want to learn about?” and have them pick any that comes to mind.) 

Tuesday

Skill: Joint Attention

When your child is looking out the window, point to birds flying by and encourage them to point to them as well. Share in their reaction. 

While outside for a walk have your child look for different animals. Point out or comment on what they are noticing. For example: “I see a squirrel in the tree, what’s it doing? Do you see the cat laying in the window? I think it’s sleeping.”

Tip! Try to follow your child’s lead by focusing first on what they are attending to, before trying to shift their focus to what you see. Example: while walking they look in the direction of a dog: “You see a dog! It has spots.  Look over there, I see a squirrel. It is brown and has 4 legs.”

You can also use activities such as scavenger hunts to structure shared time and encourage the skills listed above.  Here is a link to some  templates:

https://kinderart.com/blog/10-photo-scavenger-hunts/

If your child is older they might enjoy bringing a phone or a camera along for the walk so you can snap some pictures together  of animals you see along the way.  This could spark potential interest for further research into animals they may have spotted and want to learn more about.

Wednesday

Skill: Turn-Taking

Lay out different animals (you could use plastic toys, stuffed animals, or pictures of animals) and take turns picking one up and making the corresponding animal sound or, stating a fact about that specific animal. 

Play “I’m thinking of” using animals as the category. Example: “I’m thinking of an animal that lives in the ocean and is black and white.” Take turns describing different animals and guessing what the other person is describing. If you have pictures, or small toy animals, you could put them in a box while describing them and pull them out when they guess the correct animal (or use the objects or pictures of the animals to help give your child prompts or hints).

Thursday

Skill: Communication

Use animals as a base for expanding conversation on a specific topic. 

Comment on, or ask your child, Feature/Function/Class questions related to the animals you see. For example: “These animals all have 2 legs”, “These animals all live in the water,” or “These animals all eat meat”. 

If your child is older and interested in public speaking/presenting, you could have them put together a simple poster, PowerPoint presentation or brief speech related to the animals or groups of animals discussed.  They can then present their work to the entire family!

Friday

Skill: Leaving An Activity

If playing with toy animals, have your child participate in cleaning them up by placing them into a container. If talking about animals you see while walking, have them wave goodbye as you walk by.

Communication

Each week we are focusing on a different vocabulary word to help build your child’s communication skills.   

This week’s words are “DIFFERENT” and “SAME”.

Activity Ideas: Here are some ideas to use “DIFFERENT” and “SAME” this week: 

Routines:  Have fun getting dressed! Try on things that are the “same” or  “different”. If you are doing laundry, talk about finding socks that are the “same” and make sure you don’t match two “different” ones! This can also be time to discuss how we wear “different” clothing every day, everyone has “different” toothbrushes or we use “different” things to wash our hair, hands, or body. Maybe you want to match each other and wear the “same” colour or type of clothes! 

Books: Use “spot the difference” pages or books. You can look at photos together and point out what is “different”. Here are some online examples: https://bit.ly/2X6VIvo 

When you finish reading a short book, you can ask your child if they want to read a “different” book. Some children like to read the “same” book over and over! 

Snacks/Meals: If you have choices for food at home, you might ask your child if they want the “same” or “different” foods from other days. You can also comment on the foods you are both eating.  Are they the “same” or “different”? Did you eat something “different” for breakfast or lunch? 

Outside: Have fun with “different” kinds of moving! Take turns using different physical activities (e.g. jumping, spinning) or acting like different kinds of animals. You can choose to do the “same” as your partner, or something “different” when it is your turn. Or one person could be the director and communicate “same” or “different” after a specific period of time - you can continue or switch what you are acting out. 

Games and Play: There are many opportunities to use the words “different” and “same” when you play with toys and games.  For example, dress a doll or a paper doll, trying on lots of “different” outfits. Ask your child if your doll should wear something “different” or if you want to copy each other and have the “same” outfit.  Use Play-Doh to make “different” or the “same” shapes. Squish your creations and make more “different” ones. Memory and Go Fish Games are great for saying if the cards are the “same” or “different”. 

Partner Strategy: Try this strategy to support your child’s communication: 

Making Comments/Self-Talk: (time to revisit modelling)  

Use self-talk as you model on your child’s device. “Self-talk” means commenting on what you are doing - whether it is during routines, when you are playing together or when you are watching a movie or TV show.  Make statements using core vocabulary words (e.g. “I like this cookie”, “I found the same picture”, or “Look at that car going so fast!”) and model them on your child’s communication system.  This shows them different times or situations when they can use the word, as well as where it is located.  If your child has a higher tech device, you can also self-talk or “think aloud” as you explore folders you are opening, helping your child navigate to find certain words.  The idea is to model often without expecting your child to respond! 

For more information and examples explore the following:  

Explanation of Strategy: 

https://youtu.be/mXj1Btf0qFw 

https://bit.ly/2M7eigW 

https://bit.ly/3gweIeL

Video Examples using the words “different” and “same”: 

Books: 

It's Okay to be Different: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EtevpudIXw 

Songs: 

Little People Songs:  Different is Good:  https://youtu.be/Aiqj94FgHIA 

KidsTV123 The Same or Different Game 1:  https://youtu.be/Gng5a5FCSZc 

Ideas: 

Wingsworks:  Same and Different  https://youtu.be/AL5X0dXsBH0  

Sesame Street – Same and Different:  https://youtu.be/uATf5EhLebM 

Ideas for Different:  https://www.coreworkshop.org/words/different/en 

 

For more specific information for your child, contact your child’s Speech Language Pathologist (ask your teacher if you need help).  Most of all, just spending time interacting and talking with your child will help to build their communication skills! 
May 25 - May 29
Printable PDF version
May 25 - May 29
Life Skills

*Please continue to provide opportunities to practice the life skills previously posted in the Week at Glance. 

Turn Taking 

Leisure skills are certainly a life skill that everyone must learn to engage in. Part of playing games (a popular leisure activity) requires being able to successfully take turns.  Taking turns requires waiting and patience and this can certainly be difficult for many children. This week, we encourage you to play some games with your child(ren) and emphasize the importance of waiting their turn. It’s easiest to start with playing two person games that have quick turns and then moving on to adding more players as the time required to wait will increase. Here are some strategies and visuals to support the understanding of turn taking.    

Extensions: 

Numeracy - Playing card games and board games are a great way to teach numeracy skills as well. Recognition of numbers, one-to-one correspondence and simple addition are just a few of the numeracy concepts that can be reinforced during game time.   


Social - Playing games with others can also support the acceptance of winning and losing. This is a great time to teach your child(ren) how to be a good sport in both winning and losing games.
Oral Language and Literacy
Monday

Spreading Teen Positivity: Create an inspirational poster using an ipad or computer. Be creative with colours, font, shapes, a border and other elements of text. Include an image and a positive message or quote that has meaning to you. Then, share your positivity with friends & family or keep as your homescreen.

The poster can be  modified for elementary students by

  • creating the poster together on technology 

  • creating your own  image with paper and colour

  • print a positive quote, add images, colour and talk about what it means

  • put the image up in your room or share in a window

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Segmenting 

Say It, Chop It, Read It. Segmenting is the ability to separate a spoken word into its individual sounds and is an important skill for spelling. Watch the video to see this literacy skill in action. https://youtu.be/z5AJPhK79qk

Talk It Up! Living Room

One of the easiest ways to support language development is to infuse language concepts into everyday conversation.

Watching TV or Reading A Story

- discuss fantasy vs. reality

- talk about characters' feelings

- predict what might happen

- retell the events of the story/show

Labeling

BASIC: door, window, curtains

SPECIFIC: knob, switch, outlet, wire, shutters, alarm, charger

I SPY Categories

something round, something tall, something hard, something delicious, something loud

Tuesday

Outdoor Literacy          

Take a nature walk and gather some stones. Any size will do. On each of the rocks print a letter. Print extra vowels and common letters used like l and t. You can now…

  • Play games to Identify the letters by name or sound

  • Make your name or family names

  • Make words

  • For secondary students create a positive message, photograph and then share

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Segmenting

Tap Out The Sounds Like A Woodpecker. Today we will practice our sound segmenting skills by using our fingers to tap out the sounds in words. Tune in to see the ‘say it, tap it, read it’ learning routine.

https://youtu.be/aguV4nF2Ht0

Talk It Up! Vocabulary

Word Map. Complete a word map for the word ‘enormous’ to deepen word knowledge. Read the definition and then work together to fill in one or two words for each of the remaining boxes. Antonyms (if it is not large, then it is _____, the opposite of enormous) non-examples (tell me things that are small or little), examples (tell me things that are large or enormous), synonyms (what is another word for enormous or large). Continue the word learning by drawing a picture of something ENORMOUS. 

Wednesday

Memory Game:

  1. Collect objects from around the house (5-10 items) such as ruler, pen, comb, etc. 

  2.  Place the objects on a table and cover with a scarf or something similar. Tell your child/teen they have 4 minutes (vary the time depending on your child) to look carefully at the objects and remember them. After 4 minutes cover the objects again. The child must write down what they saw. 

  3. Talk with your child about while they remembered some items and not others.

  4. Repeat with different items

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Segmenting 

Knock, Knock. Have fun practising your sound segmenting skills with the ‘knock it, chop it, read it’ learning routine. See this reading and spelling skill in action. https://youtu.be/XcZ7I3ETQFs

Talk It Up! ‘Appy Wednesday

World’s Worst Pet

Compatible with: iPad (free)

A vocabulary building app for older elementary students (Grades 4+). Deepens their understanding of new, more sophisticated words with the help of student-friendly word definitions and exposure to antonyms (opposites) and synonyms (words that mean the same thing). 

Thursday

Question Me:

  1. On a piece of paper, both you and your child/teen (and any other family members who would like to join) draw a stick person to represent yourself  (Those who are more artistically gifted can of course make a more interesting creation!)

  2. Draw lines coming from your figure. At the ends of these lines, write numbers, nouns,adjectives or any words that have significance to you

When complete, take turns asking questions that these words and numbers may be the answer to. i.e Child/teen: “Have you two brothers or sisters? Parent: “Yes, I have two brothers.”

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Segmenting

Chop It Up At Home. Use the ‘say it, chop it, read it’ learning routine to segment the sounds in words from around the house. Pull down a learning tool (e.g., bingo chips) while you say each sound in the word. 

Bag (b-a-g), Comb (c-o-mb), Toe (t-oe), Cup (c-u-p), rice (r-i-ce), phone (ph-o-ne), shoe (sh-oe), chip (ch-i-p)

Talk It Up! Vocabulary

Play Categories. One player selects a “category” and the other players take turns naming items that belong in that group. The category can be as broad as “animals,” or as narrow as “types of dogs.”The category chosen determines how difficult or easy the game is. Players can not repeat an item that has already been said. The game continues until players run out of ideas for the category.

Category Suggestions: Easier; Animals, clothing, food. Challenge: Animals that hop or jump, farm animals, fast animals, pets, things we wear on our feet, winter clothes, vegetables, candy, breakfast food, desserts.

Friday

Listen to Reading:

Click on the link below to listen to the book:

Hug Machine by Scott Campbell

Click on the link below to listen to a song inspired by the book:

Hug Machine Song by Emily Arrow, book by Scott Campbell

Extension Activities:

1.Talk about all the things the “Hug Machine” hugs in the story. What are some funny things you could think of to hug? How do the “Hug Machine’s” hugs make people feel?

2.Make your own silly hug checklist like the one found in the book. Use pictures and/or words.

3.  Draw a picture of ANYTHING you want to hug. Write a sentence to tell about your picture. Be Creative!

4.   Click on the link to access free printables created by the author.https://t.co/RR4Dd4R2FR

Reading With Your Ears:

Sound Segmenting

Chop It Up Outside. Keep practicing your early spelling skills by chopping up the sounds in words from the outdoors. Rain (r-ai-n), sun (s-u-n), rock (r-o-ck), bike (b-i-ke), bee (b-ee), hat (h-a-t). 

Numeracy
Monday

*NEW* (Optional) Weekly Challenge: Amusement Park Project: Each week you will work towards creating your own amusement park. Additional challenges will be added weekly. 

This week: Your challenge is to research some amusement parks in your area and to make a list of all the features you would want to include in your dream amusement park (rides, games, food, etc.).

Warm-Up (using coins):

Give your child(ren) 10-20 mixed coins and ask your child(ren) to sort them. 

Extension: Ask your child(ren) to explain their sorting rule.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Numeracy Challenge: Explore an emoji math puzzle with your child(ren) at the link below. 

Solve Moji Math

Tuesday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Have your child(ren) identify and describe various coins (i.e. nickel, dime, quarter, $1 coin, $2 coin), using actual coins, digital coins, or drawings. Have your child(ren) state their value.

Extension: Have your child(ren) identify $5, $10, $20, $50, $100 bills and their value.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Geometry Challenge: Find 3D shapes around the house or use the links below to create your own. With your child(ren), discuss the different attributes of each shape. Eg. how many edges, vertices (corners), faces/sides, does it roll or slide? etc.

Cube:

https://www.math-salamanders.com/image-files/3d-geometric-shapes-cube-net-tabs.gif

Square-based pyramid

https://www.math-salamanders.com/image-files/geometry-printables-square-based-pyramid-net-1-tabs.gif

Cone:

https://www.math-salamanders.com/image-files/nets-of-3d-shapes-cone-net-tabs.gif

Wednesday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Have your child(ren) order money from least to greatest value (i.e. nickel, dime, quarter, $1 coin, $2 coin), using actual coins, digital coins or drawings.

Extension: Have your child(ren) order money from least to greatest value using $5, $10, $20, $50, $100 bills.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Probability Challenge: Have your child(ren) draw pictures of or talk about things your family does always, often,  sometimes and some things your family never does. Ask your child(ren) what other everyday events he or she could talk about by using this kind of language.

Use this link to print and help organize your ideas: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IzasEhxv6_7Rrtd1MjCFrn0qL3bYBTStgXaroy5UTdk/edit?usp=sharing

Thursday

Warm-Up (using coins):

Give your child(ren) 5-10 nickels, and ask your child(ren) to skip count by 5’s to determine the total value of the coins provided. Repeat with dimes (skip count by 10’s).

Extension: Use quarters and ask your child(ren) to skip count by 25’s.

Digital coins:

mathies SWF Opener

Measurement Challenge: Using a tape measure, ruler, and/or non-standard units (multiples of the same sized item, eg. paper clips, nickels, goldfish crackers), with your child(ren) measure various objects or spaces around your home or outside.

Extension: Put the objects in order from smallest to biggest OR try using a tape measure to measure the height of each member of your household.
Friday

Fun Friday (Coding): Explore one of these coding websites with your child(ren):

Hour of code: https://hourofcode.com/ca

Erase all kittens: https://eraseallkittens.com/

Tynker: https://www.tynker.com/

Scratch Studio: https://scratch.mit.edu/studios/894964/
Fine Motor
Monday

Using any small item in your pantry (dry beans, pasta etc.), pour some onto a table and practice moving them into a cup, one by one.

Create a “Paper Ghost” drawing. Wrinkle a piece of paper, then flatten it out.  Have your child see if they can find any objects in the wrinkled portion and trace over the objects that they see. Some wrinkled portions may have objects like a face, flower, boat, airplane, house and so on. They can finish off by colouring if they choose.

Tuesday

Finger isolation is being able to move just one finger at a time, perhaps to point or scratch an itch. Try the following activity to strengthen finger isolation:

  • Shoot marbles into a box

  • Move only one finger, even if just a twitch at a time

Play a game.  The best games are those with small pieces that require lots of movement and use of their pincer grip, like Scrabble, Jenga, Checkers, Snakes and Ladders and Monopoly.

Wednesday

Practicing beauty routines: Putting on makeup and creating complex hairstyles require a surprising amount of fine motor skill.

Rubber bands make great “resistance training” for your fingers. Simply place the bands around your thumb and index finger and try to push the band apart. You can do this with all 4 of your fingers.

Thursday

Play Card Games– It takes some pretty solid fine motor skills to hold a fan of cards or pick one up from a table. Try simple card games like Uno, Go Fish and War.

Make an Origami- Fold a piece of paper in half by bringing the bottom half towards the top. Fold in half again by bringing the right side towards the left side. Fold in half again by bringing the left side towards the right side. It will look like a triangle with the bottom layers extending beyond the top layers. Cut the folded paper into the shape of one petal. It will look like an ice cream cone. Unfold this paper and you will get a beautiful flower.

https://www.origami-resource-center.com/kirigami-flower.html

Friday

Practice using scissors. You could cut out a design you created, cut out people and objects from a magazine to create a collage, or cut out food items from grocery store flyers to make a grocery list.

Play with playdough. Roll into small balls, push beads into play dough, pretend you’re making cookies and the beads are chocolate chips, or hide the beads in the play dough and search for hidden treasure as you exercise those finger muscles!

Physical Activity
Monday

The Dice is Right

Develop aerobic, balance, and core fitness skills through this fun game!

Cut up a piece of paper into smaller pieces and write out different aerobic, balance, and

core activities on the papers.

Lay the papers on the floor or the ground and create six

columns, placing 3 papers in each column. Some examples of activities are:

  • Plank x 20 seconds

  • Pretend to jump rope x 10

  • Sprint back and forth in the playing area x 2

  • Wall sit x 20 seconds

  • Long jumps x 5

  • Hop back and forth over a line x 10

  • Wall push-ups x 10

  • Bridge x 20 seconds

  • Sit down and stand up x 5

  • Jumping Jacks x 10

  • Tree pose x 5 seconds

  • High knees x 20

Ensure there is enough space to do the activity away from any safety hazards.

The child rolls the dice and chooses an activity from the corresponding column (e.g., a 3

is rolled so choose a paper from the 3rd column).

Perform the activity together and allow anyone who is playing to take a turn rolling the dice.

Play for an allotted amount of time or until you have done most of the activities 2-3 times.

For further information please click on the link below:

https://phecanada.ca/activate/phe-home-learning-centre/physical-education-activities

Tuesday

Dance in Space at Your Place

Material: Music

Learning Outcome: Discuss the element of space in dance and create a dance sequence

that contains the components of space.

Description: Dance has various elements to consider. One of these elements is space. Space can be described by:

Shape: circles, squares, triangles, etc. made with parts of the body, the whole body,

or with groups of people

Level: distance from the floor (high, medium, low)

Direction: where the body moves (forward, backward, up, down, diagonally)

Pathways: patterns taken as we move (straight, curved, zig-zag)

Focus: where the eyes look while dancing

Size: how large or small the movements are


Share these components of space with your child/ren and challenge them to create a dance

sequence that contains each component (e.g., sequence contains a few shapes, at a

few levels, in changing directions, taking a few pathways, with large and small movements, and eyes focused on particular points).

Encourage your child/ren to choose a song they like and provide them with time to create the sequence. Support them as needed and also consider creating your own sequence.

Get the whole family involved and share your sequences with each other!

For more information, please click on the link below:

https://phecanada.ca/activate/phe-home-learning-centre/physical-education-activities

Wednesday

This Or That Tabata

Materials: An outdoor or indoor space which gives enough room to fully stretch out. Use either a yoga mat, floor mat, or a towel for any floor exercises you complete

Description: Tabata is a High Intensity Interval Training where you workout for 20 seconds and rest for 10 seconds. In the video below, there are 8 rounds of heart beating fun. Follow along to the instructions.

https://peuniverse.com/video/this-or-that-tabata-style-2/

Thursday

Fan Favourite - Challenge

Description: How many times can you fan your back back and forth between the paper balls using the book in one minute. Your paper balls should be ten feet apart.

Materials: A book, a plastic bag and two paper balls.

See the video for the challenge in action:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJuYFFKyoew&feature=youtu.be

You can challenge another person in the family or beat your score each time. Another option is to extend the distance by placing the paper balls farther apart.

Friday

Lesson: Sending and Receiving Objects

View this video from the OPHEA website for a lesson on sending and receiving objects:

https://youtu.be/cfx25cJsbQU

Social Skills

Theme for the week: Meal Time 

Focus: Making a choice 

Offer different choices related to meal times, such as: 

  • What to make for a meal by showing the items, a picture of the item or verbally asking

  • Where to sit at the table

  • What dishes to use

  • What to drink with the meal

  • Where to eat the meal

Take inventory of your groceries for the week, then print out/draw 3-7 different meal options that you are willing/able to make. You could also write them on Post-It notes if your child is able to read. Allow your child to choose which meals they would like each day by placing the pictures/words on a calendar for the week.

Tip! If choosing the actual meal is not an option, try providing choices such as sides, drinks, or dipping sauces. 

Focus: Joint Attention

Prepare part of the meal together by asking your child to give you an ingredient, stir in an item, or hold a bowl and ask your child to pour something into it. Use gestures, such as pointing to a spoon or modeling a pouring motion, to help focus your child’s attention on the message and task.

Tip! It is helpful to gather all required materials ahead of time (mixing bowls, spoons) to avoid having to leave to get these items mid-task. This will also help maintain momentum, and avoid distraction, if your child is still working on attending to tasks for longer periods of time. 

Focus: Turn Taking

To encourage turn taking and waiting, set up a “family style” meal (each part of the meal is served in a large bowl or plate, and passed around for everyone to serve themselves). Once your child has taken what they want, have them pass the bowl or plate to the person beside them, instead of simply placing the bowl down on the table.

Tip! When preparing a meal with your child, premeasure/chop seasonings and other ingredients into small bowls or cups so that you and your child can quickly take turns pouring them into a larger mixing bowl. 

Focus: Communication 

Have your child invite others to the table for the meal using gestures, their communication device, or by verbally asking. 

Give a small amount of food at first to encourage your child to ask for more using gestures, their device, or words. 

Ask your child a question related to their meal. They can respond to a question such as “Do you like this meal?” orally, by giving a thumbs up or down, or by imitating you shaking or nodding your head.

Tip! Build communication temptations into meal time by offering preferred foods without necessary tools (such as pasta with no fork) or ingredients (such as fries, but no ketchup). If your child doesn’t initiate asking for the missing item prompt them to request it.

Focus: Leaving an Activity

To indicate that the meal is finished practice using social skills like asking to leave the table, wiping mouths with a napkin, clearing some of the dishes, or washing hands. 

Tip! It is always best to end an activity on a positive note! If your child is done eating, but others are not, and you notice your child is beginning to show signs that they want to leave the table, prompt them to request to leave (orally, or using signs, gestures, or a communication device) and then let them know they can get up and move away from the table. 

If you want to work on having your child sit for longer before leaving the table, you could use a visual timer. Slowly increase the length of time your child is expected to sit as they show success!

Communication

Each week we are focusing on a different vocabulary word to help build your child’s communication skills.   

This week we are combining some ideas to focus on the pronouns; “I” “you” and “it”.

Activity Ideas: Here are some ideas to use the words “I”, “you” and “it” this week: 

Routines: During laundry, sort the clothes by who they belong to! If you grab your child’s shirt, you might use “it” and “you” and put it in your child’s pile!  (e.g. “I think it is for you.”) 

Books: Use books with pictures! Everything in the book can be “it”. If you see a funny or interesting picture, you can use “look” and “it” together (e.g. “look at it”; “it is funny”; “Do You see it?”) 

Snacks/Meals:  When preparing or eating together, you can model some longer phrases with other core words (want, like, not, more). Think about combinations like: “I like it”, “You do not want it” when you talk about food items! 

Outside: Play a “follow the leader” game. One person can copy the other in a silly dance or motion. If you want to pick the action, you can use “I”. When you are done, point to “you” to ask the other person to copy what you did!  During a game of tag, you can decide who is “it”. Am “I” “it” or are “you” “it”? 

Games and Play: Think about games that involve turn-taking. You can use “I” and “you” to direct the turns in any game! This works well with games and activities that have parts or equipment (e.g. dice, spinner, ball).  Model the word “I” when you are taking a turn, and “you” as you hand off the piece of equipment to your child; repeat to extend the conversation.

Partner Strategy: Try this strategy to support your child’s communication: 

Expand Your Child’s Message/ Combining Words: 

When modelling, you can expand on your child’s message to show them how to create longer phrases, or to show them how to use words in different ways.  For example, “want” could be expanded to model “want-it”, “not-want”, or “I-want”.  Try to expand one step/word ahead of what your child is already doing to build on their current communication. Expanding messages using pronouns can encourage more social communication functions such as commenting (e.g. “you want”, “like go”), asking questions (e.g. “you like it?”), and taking turns (e.g. “I go”). 

For more information and examples explore the following: 

Explanation of Strategy:   

https://youtu.be/OQBvvGzVX7U 

https://youtu.be/3VA_5S8ExsU 

https://www.instagram.com/p/CAKgVQOAa4D/ 

Videos:

Read Alouds:

I Have Feelings:  https://youtu.be/WxKdYKjgjt8 

You are Not Small:  https://youtu.be/5fCdysc8j7A 

It Looked Like Spilt Milk  https://youtu.be/KxwydtV_d2E 

Songs 

Skinamarink:  https://youtu.be/ug1pI-Ephns 

Sight Word Song “I”:  https://youtu.be/2NWSMCPlxk8 

The Walking Chicken:  https://youtu.be/9NXTVeVV1DA 

I'm Hungry:  https://youtu.be/CCke0NvGy70 Sight Word Song “you”:  https://youtu.be/uvxrXx2SrsY  

Happy Sam English – Hello, How Are You?:  https://youtu.be/vQrsrE87aHU 

If You’re Happy and You Know It https://youtu.be/71hqRT9U0wg  

Sight Word “It”  https://youtu.be/PqeOqtgkC-Q 

Ideas

Ideas for “I”  https://youtu.be/jhSfnIkAU4k  

Ideas for “you”  https://youtu.be/wKwjIVaJkS8  

Ideas for “it”  https://youtu.be/DFIMrtedplg 

For more specific information for your child, contact your child’s Speech Language Pathologist (ask your teacher if you need help).  Most of all, just spending time interacting and talking with your child will help to build their communication skills!  

Please visit our Speech-Language website atbit.ly/TVDSB_SLP and follow @tvdsb.slp​ on Instagram!

May 18 - May 22
Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, May 18 - May 22, 2020

May 11 - May 15

Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, May 11 - May 15, 2020
May 4 - May 8
Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, May 4 - May 8, 2020
April 27 - May 1
Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, April 27 - May 1, 2020
April 20 - April 24
Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, April 20 - April 24, 2020
April 14 - April 17
Printable PDF, Week at a Glance, April 14 - April 17, 2020

Supplemental Resources

Our Special Education team has developed a webpage of optional, supplementary resources for families and students with special education needs. 

If parents/guardians choose to use any of the third party resources listed in the chart below, they are encouraged to review each application that their child is using to ensure they are comfortable with the privacy and security settings outlined in the user agreement.

Self Regulation

https://www.youtube.com/user/CosmicKidsYoga?reload=9  
Yoga, mindfulness and relaxation designed specially for kids aged 3+, used in schools and homes all over the world.

 

https://mixlab.withgoogle.com/ 
Make music using voice commands.

 

https://wedolisten.org/home#no-hide   
Social skills stories for younger children.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu0YEii4FkQ 
This app helps a character work through frustrating situations with strategy choices.

 

https://family.gonoodle.com/  
Engages kids with movement and mindfulness videos created by child development experts.

Organization

https://www.mindomo.com/ 
Create mind maps, concept maps, outlines and charts to improve your thinking and learning

 

https://popplet.com/ 
Organize your ideas with mind maps, easy to take photos or to add images/visuals

Students with Autism

https://www.autism.nf.net/covid-19-resources-to-keep-busy-from-home/

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